The coal tit is also not uncommon in Germany.

The coal tit is also not uncommon in Germany.

The blue tit is also slightly smaller than a great tit. With a breeding population of 2.6 to 3.3 million pairs, it is one of the most common tit species.

The coal tit is also not uncommon in Germany. As big as the blue tit, the head colored similarly to the great tit and with a breeding population of 1.4 to 1.9 million pairs, this tit is also one of the top 3 in terms of frequency.

Breeding population of the titmouse: other species

Crested tits differ in color, but also in breeding population, from the two known tit species in Germany, the great tit and the blue tit. The crested tit has a black and white head with a feather hood and is a little more sensitive to cold than other species. With 340,000 to 450,000 pairs, their breeding population is as low as that of the swamp tit.

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Only the willow tit is represented in an even smaller population in Germany: namely with 170,000 to 220,000 breeding pairs.

That rabbits are born to bring Easter eggs is one of those beliefs of many children that are not true, but harmless. But can the little ones be expected to read the bloody Bible material of the Easter days? The death of Jesus on the cross, his resurrection? Pastor Christiane Zimmermann-Fröb is convinced of this.

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Don’t evade

Zimmermann-Fröb is a speaker for Children’s Bible Weeks in the Church with Children Office of the Evangelical Church of Rhineland and has dealt a lot with the question of how to explain Easter in a child-friendly manner. The agency has published a book with materials for church work with children. Zimmermann-Fröb explains her conviction that many children have already experienced suffering and death. "The children also see crosses and crucifixes in everyday life – we shouldn’t avoid that."

How to explain Easter

Good Friday, however, has it all: after the betrayal by Judas, Jesus is arrested by the Romans, driven up Mount Golgotha ​​with the cross on his back, and crucified. Christiane Zimmermann-Fröb doesn’t shy away from that either. In her experience, this is not worrying for children – rather it makes them sad that someone so good is murdered, she says. The children also asked when she explained that Jesus was nailed to the cross. For example: "How did they do that?" or "Does that hurt?"

Tell in full

Zimmermann-Fröb and her colleagues tell the Passion story in full from the Last Supper, which is commemorated on Maundy Thursday. The richness of detail has to be weighed up. "And especially for the younger ones, the little comforter has to be included right from the start" says the pastor, because it takes weeks in kindergartens or in child worship services to describe the last days of Jesus’ life. "That is why we tell of the happy ending, of the resurrection on Easter Sunday, of the new life of Jesus at God’s side" explains Zimmermann-Froeb.

Easter eggs represent the locked grave

The message of the Easter days is that God does not leave people with suffering just like Jesus Christ alone in it, and that death does not have the last word. Christians associate the festival with the hope that it will not only apply to Jesus, but to all people. The passion story does not tell the children that there is no more suffering. "But it is brought before God, who bears and holds it for you and maybe changes it" says the pastor. She has nothing against the Easter Bunny. It just shouldn’t be everything kids think about at Easter. "The Easter bunny does not carry them on in difficult times in life" says Zimmermann-Froeb. She also promotes thinking not only of food when thinking of Easter eggs, but also of the Christian interpretation: "They stand for the closed grave from which new life arises."

Vegetable salad & fresh herbs:

1 zucchini, 1 small eggplant, 1 red pepper, 1 yellow pepper, 600 g celeriac, 4 small carrots, 2 beetroot tubers, 1 pound waxy potatoes, 4 shallots, 1 garlic, 1 small oak leaf salad, 1 organic lemon.

½ bunch of tarragon, 2 stalks of flat leaf parsley, 2 sprigs of thyme, 1 sprig of rosemary, 1 sprig of basil, 1 sprig of mint.

Flesh:

600 g pork tenderloin

fruit & Nuts:

1 glass of pitted sour cherries (300 g net weight), 30 g ground hazelnuts or walnuts, 100 g ground poppy seeds.

Egg, cheese & other dairy products:

3 eggs, 200 g goat cream cheese, 100 g sheep cheese, 100 g quark or layered cheese.

Oil, vinegar & Spices:

Olive oil, herb vinegar, 1 teaspoon caraway seeds, salt, pepper, coarse sea salt, cinnamon, powdered sugar and vanilla sugar.

Others:

300 ml dark beer, 1/2 teaspoon rum for baking, vegetable stock, brown veal stock, 1 tube tomato paste, clarified butter and butter, flour.

Back to article Easter Menu 2009

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Main course – pork fillet with beer sauce (Photo: Johannes Grau for Tre Torri Verlag) For our feast neither the Easter bunny nor the lamb need to look into the tube. The renowned star chef Otto Koch, who many TV viewers know from the Friday edition of the ARD buffet, spares the cute Easter messengers. Instead, Koch has put together an aromatic 3-course menu for us from market-fresh herbs and vegetables, in which meat only plays a minor role.

What you need The shopping list for the Easter menu The starter recipe for sheep’s cheese roulade The main course recipe for pork fillet with beer sauce The dessert recipe for poppy seed noodles with cherry compote

Easy to prepare and yet sophisticated

Simply delicious: First a fine sheep’s cheese roulade in fried vegetables, followed by pork fillet in a spicy beer sauce and root vegetables, and for a sweet finish there is handmade poppy seed noodles with cherry compote. This 3-course menu is refined and yet easy to prepare, the ingredients are fresh from the market and mainly come from the region. Regional delights combined with finesse and in an unusual way – the creative star chef from Munich also wants to convey this “lesson” to the next generation of professional kitchens. “The regional cuisine forms a kind of basis in the kitchen, it creates an awareness of the area you come from and where you grew up. It is a personal positioning when you know: Where do I come from? And what is growing and thriving here? ”Describes Koch.  

Herbs for new flavor combinations

When Koch is privately at the stove, which is rarely the case, then he listens “to what my body says and if I have the feeling that my body wants something light, then I do something with vegetables. But that’s not in any recipe, ”reveals the professional. “I just try out new flavor combinations. I succeed best when there are fresh herbs. ”His favorite herbs include chives, parsley, basil, rosemary, thyme, coriander, fresh bay leaves and garlic.

Cooking with Otto Koch, ARD Buffet (Photo: Johannes Grau for Tre Torri Verlag)

Regional and with finesse

Fresh herbs are also not missing in any of his recipes that he put together for his new book “Cooking with Otto Koch”, which is published by Tre Torri Verlag in Wiesbaden. It contains the dishes from our Easter menu and other delicious “attempts to use regional products with a little finesse to make something that goes away from everyday cafeteria and products that are not expensive,” explains Otto Koch, who started his restaurant in 1976 “Le Gourmet” boiled its first star.

“Those who like to eat well can also cook well.”

With Koch’s new recipes, “you don’t have to stand in the kitchen all day to have a menu ready topadultreview.com in the evening that can then be consumed in 15 minutes”. Koch’s motto: “If you like to eat well, you can also cook well.” An exceptional taste experience does not have to be associated with star cuisine, he emphasizes and adds: “When we cook, it’s like reading: with it we take ‘world knowledge ‘in us, that not only broadens our horizons in terms of taste. “

Source: ARD buffet: Cooking with Otto Koch, Tre-Torri-Verlag, Wiesbaden 2009 (ISBN 978-3-937963-92-1), 19.90 euros.

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Egg stocks threaten to run out at Easter. (Photo: AP) The appetite is great, but especially at Easter, the supply of eggs threatens to run out. "The demand is so strong that production can hardly keep up" says Uta Schmidt from the Central Market and Price Reporting Unit (ZMP). The reason for this, however, is not only an increasing per capita consumption of eggs, but also the EU ban on keeping cages in place in Germany this year.

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Small businesses have to convert

Many smaller farms in particular are forcing the conversion measures to take a break or even to give up their business because they cannot cope with the financial burdens, say representatives of farmers and poultry associations. Farmer Karl-Frieder Kottsieper currently has his hands full. By the end of the year, the 46-year-old has to convert his poultry farm in Remscheid, North Rhine-Westphalia, from cage to so-called small group housing, which should give the hens significantly more freedom with at least 800 square centimeters of space per animal.

Egg shortage particularly bad this year

According to Kottsieper, the cost per hen is between 20 and 40 euros, depending on the complexity of the renovation. "Such expenses would normally be made gradually, but now it’s about an investment in a very short time. That is hard" says the farmer, who is also chairman of the poultry industry association in North Rhine-Westphalia. He knows from many of his colleagues that they cannot cope with this. "They give up or have to significantly reduce their number of hens" he said. Consumers will also feel the consequences. "Egg shortages are normal at Easter, but this year is especially bad" says Agnes Scharl from the German Farmers’ Association (DBV). The German farmers, who until now have mostly relied on cages, are under great pressure because of the transition period that expires at the end of 2009.

Eggs significantly more expensive

The DBV fears that the level of self-sufficiency in eggs in Germany could decrease further in view of the problems faced by many farmers. It is already well below 70 percent. Because the cage ban in the other EU countries will not be binding until 2012, a further increase in imports is likely. According to the ZMP, egg prices have risen particularly sharply this year: In the meantime, they are at 8.47 euros per 100 pieces in wholesalers, said Schmidt. In 2007, shortly before Easter, the price was 7.45 euros. The declining demand after Easter should ease the situation again, said the ZMP expert.

Eggs will remain more expensive

In the long term, however, consumers have to be prepared to spend more on their eggs, said Thomas Janning, managing director of the Central Association of the German Poultry Industry (ZDG).